Resources Science ›› 2017, Vol. 39 ›› Issue (1): 147-156.doi: 10.18402/resci.2017.01.15

• Orignal Article • Previous Articles     Next Articles

The spatial-temporal distribution of maximum depth of frozen soil and its response to temperature change in the Songhuajiang River Basin

LI Jia1, 2, ZHOU Zuhao2, WANG Hao2, Liu Jiajia2   

  1. 1. Environmental Science and Engineering Department,Donghua University,Shanghai 201620,China;
    2. State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin,China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research (IWHR),Beijing 100038,China
  • Received:2016-08-02 Revised:2016-11-09 Online:2017-01-20 Published:2017-01-20

Abstract: In the Songhuajiang River Basin seasonal frozen soil is extensively distributed. Frozen soil is defined as a soil temperature of 0 °C or below 0 °C where the soil freezes causing changes in soil characteristics,soil structure and hydrological processes. Based on data from 56 meteorological stations in the Songhuajiang River Basin and surrounding areas,the temporal and spatial distribution of the maximum depth of frozen soil in the Songhuajiang River Basin from 1960 to 2004 and its relationship with air temperature were analyzed using climate statistical analysis methods. We found that the annual maximum depth of frozen soil north of the region is higher than that in the south. The monthly maximum depth of frozen soil in the basin shows seasonal variation,with the maximum occurring in March. At the same time,the maximum depth of frozen soil in high latitude area was higher than in a low latitude area. There was a distinct decrease from 1960 to 2004 across the basin,with regression coefficients of -8.25 cm per year,and the annual mean air temperature of the frozen period has increased with variation of 0.41°C per decade. There was an abrupt change of the maximum depth of frozen soil in mid 1980s,and the maximum depth of frozen soil was reduced by 35 cm. This study also found that the maximum depth of frozen soil and annual mean temperature are negatively correlated at spatial and temporal scales and the response of the maximum depth of frozen soil at high latitudes to climate warming is slower at lower latitudes.

Key words: abrupt change, changing trend, maximum depth of frozen soil, Songhuajiang River Basin